Skip to main content

C.H.C. Amerman Photographs

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 0325

Scope and Contents

This collection contains 8x10" black and white photographic prints developed from 3 1/2" x 5" glass plate negatives. The original photographs were taken by C.H.C. Amerman around 1898-1905. The prints that comprise this collection were created by HMRC staff around 1987.

Many of the photos depict C.H.C. Amerman's friends and family, including his brother Almeron Earl Amerman, his sisters Katy Terrell Amerman and Nona Leigh Amerman, and his parents Almeron Fields Amerman and Mary F. Collings. There are also numerous photos of the Amerman-Collings home and its surroundings on White Oak Bayou.

While most of the photographs are set in Houston, there are also some from Austin and Galveston. These include images of the Colorado River in Austin, the state capitol building, and a camping trip at Red Bluff on Galveston Bay.

Photographs MSS0325-029 to MSS0325-035 feature views of the city of Houston, probably taken from the Harris County Courthouse.

Photograph MSS0325-123 appears to show an African American man--tenatively identified as "Old Mike?" by the donor's family--working in a field. Photographs MSS0325-097, MSS0325-111, and MSS0325-124 show a man and two children seated on the front porch. One of the children appears to be a young African American girl.

Dates

  • 1898 - 1905

Creator

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions

Permission to publish or reproduce materials from MSS0325 C.H.C. Amerman Photographs must be obtained from the Houston Metropolitan Research Center or the appropriate copyright holder.

Biographical Note

Charles Henry Collings (C.H.C.) Amerman was born on March 19, 1884, in Houston, Texas. He was the son of Almeron Fields (A.F.) Amerman and Mary F. Collings. A. F. Amerman worked in the city assessor's office and the H & T C, and the couple were early Houston residents. The Collings-Amerman home was at 35 Collings Place, on the banks of White Oak Bayou and south of the Katy Railroad Yards.

According to the University of Texas Record, volume 9, number 1 from January 1909, C.H.C. Amerman received degrees in 1904 and 1905. He went on to practice law in Houston and was later appointed Director of the Southern Piney Tie and Lumber Company of Houston and Montgomery.

C.H.C. Amerman married Lillie Emelie Abel on October 28, 1916, and they would have two sons, Jack and Robert "Bob" Amerman. He died on 16 June 1946, in Houston at the age of 62, and was buried in Glenwood Cemetery.

C.H.C.'s oldest brother, Almeron Earl (A.E) Amerman, served as Harris County Judge from 1907-1913, chairman of the City Planning Commission, and Mayor of the City of Houston from 1918–1921. As county judge and head of commissioners court, A.E. Amerman oversaw the construction of the 1910 Courthouse.

Extent

2.5 Linear Feet (4 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Acquisition Information

In 1987, Robert "Bob" Amerman brought the original glass plate negatives to HMRC, where prints were then created. The glass plates themselves were not donated to HMRC.

Related Materials

MSS 0061 Amerman-Collings Family papers, HMRC, HPL. https://hplarchives.lyrasistechnology.org/repositories/2/resources/490

MC028 A.E. Amerman Collection, 1895–1964 at the Harris County archives includes glass plate negatives taken by C.H.C. Amerman. http://www.harriscountyarchives.com/Portals/1/Documents/Finding%20Aids/FA-AmermanMC028.pdf .

Creator

Title
C.H.C. Amerman Photographs
Status
Completed
Author
Matt Richardson
Date
February 12, 2021
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Houston Metropolitan Research Center Repository

Contact:

The African American Library at the Gregory School
1300 Victor Street
Houston, Texas 77019
832-393-1440
HPL.Gregoryschool@houstontx.gov
Houston Metropolitan Research Center
Houston Public Library
550 McKinney St.
Houston, Texas 77002
TXR.Reference@houstontx.gov
832-393-1662